Marcus Garvey founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association in
Marcus Garvey founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association in

“Our success educationally, industrially and politically is based upon the protection of a nation founded by ourselves. And the nation can be nowhere else but in Africa.” – Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Jr. 

MARCUS GARVEY

On June 10, 1940, Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Jr., publisher, entrepreneur, orator, and Black Nationalist, died. Garvey was born August 17, 1887 in St. Ann’s Bay, Jamaica. In 1914, Garvey founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association, “To unite all people of African ancestry of the world to one great body to establish a country and absolute government of their own.”

Garvey moved to New York City in 1916 and founded the Negro World newspaper. In June, 1923, Garvey was unjustly convicted of mail fraud and sentenced to five years in prison. That sentence was commuted by President Calvin Coolidge and Garvey was released in November, 1927 and deported to Jamaica where he is interred at a shrine in National Heroes Park.

There are memorials to Garvey around the world, including statues and streets and schools named after him in Jamaica, Trinidad, the United States, Canada, Kenya, Nigeria, and the United Kingdom. A number of books have been published about Garvey and his movement, including “Black Power and the Garvey Movement” (1971), “Marcus Garvey: Anti-Colonial Champion” (1988), and “Negro with a Hat: The Rise and Fall of Marcus Garvey and his Dream of Mother Africa” (2008).

The Akosua Report: Facts on The African Diaspora, is written by Akosua Lowery. Follow her on Twitter @AkosuaLowery.

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4 COMMENTS

  1. Regarding Marcus Garvey, one very important place that was not mentioned is in your article is Limon, Costa Rica where Garvey launched the Black Star Line in 1912, 101 years ago. The place still exists today partly serves as a museum and gives tours of the location.

  2. Regarding Marcus Garvey, one very important place that was not mentioned is in your article is Limon, Costa Rica where Garvey launched the Black Star Line in 1912, 101 years ago. The place still exists today partly serves as a museum and gives tours of the location.

  3. […] On June 10, 1940, Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Jr., pub­lisher, entre­pre­neur, ora­tor, and Black Nationalist, died. Garvey was born August 17, 1887 in St. Ann’s Bay, Jamaica. In 1914, Garvey founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association, “To unite all peo­ple of African ances­try of the world to one great body to estab­lish a coun­try and absolute gov­ern­ment of their own.”Garvey moved to New York City in 1916 and founded the Negro World news­pa­per. In June, 1923, Garvey was unjustly con­victed of mail fraud and sen­tenced to five years in prison. That sen­tence was com­muted by President Calvin Coolidge and Garvey was released in November, 1927 and deported to Jamaica where he is interred at a shrine inNational Heroes Park.There are memo­ri­als to Garvey around the world, includ­ing stat­ues and streets and schools named after him in Jamaica, Trinidad, the United States, Canada, Kenya, Nigeria, and the United Kingdom. A num­ber of books have been pub­lished about Garvey and his move­ment, includ­ing “Black Power and the Garvey Movement” (1971), “Marcus Garvey: Anti-​Colonial Champion” (1988), and “Negro with a Hat: The Rise and Fall of Marcus Garvey and his Dream of Mother Africa” (2008).http://​the​bur​ton​wire​.com/​2​0​1​3​/​0​6​/​1​0​/​p​o​l​… […]

  4. […] On June 10, 1940, Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Jr., pub­lisher, entre­pre­neur, ora­tor, and Black Nationalist, died. Garvey was born August 17, 1887 in St. Ann’s Bay, Jamaica. In 1914, Garvey founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association, “To unite all peo­ple of African ances­try of the world to one great body to estab­lish a coun­try and absolute gov­ern­ment of their own.”Garvey moved to New York City in 1916 and founded the Negro World news­pa­per. In June, 1923, Garvey was unjustly con­victed of mail fraud and sen­tenced to five years in prison. That sen­tence was com­muted by President Calvin Coolidge and Garvey was released in November, 1927 and deported to Jamaica where he is interred at a shrine inNational Heroes Park. There are memo­ri­als to Garvey around the world, includ­ing stat­ues and streets and schools named after him in Jamaica, Trinidad, the United States, Canada, Kenya, Nigeria, and the United Kingdom. A num­ber of books have been pub­lished about Garvey and his move­ment, includ­ing “Black Power and the Garvey Movement” (1971), “Marcus Garvey: Anti-​Colonial Champion” (1988), and “Negro with a Hat: The Rise and Fall of Marcus Garvey and his Dream of Mother Africa” (2008).http://​the​bur​ton​wire​.com/​2​0​1​3​/​0​6​/​1​0​/​p​o​l​… […]

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